How to train tomatoes

Whilst tomatoes should have been planted out by now, you can still get them from nurseries and garden centres, ready grown and ready to nurture to cropping. The smell of fresh tomatoes, let alone the unbeatable taste of fruits picked from the vine, makes growing them well worth it.


Once your tomato plants have grown to about a foot in height, support them with a cane or stick at their side which you can use to tie them into as they grow. It’s importance to tie the. plants to a cane before they have a chance to drop, as this encourages them to grow up and produce more fruiting spurs. As they grow, pinch out all side shoots of your cordon tomatoes, but you can leave the bush types well alone to fill out. Once cordons have formed six or so fruiting trusses you should pinch out the tops. In reality I tend to let them hit the roof of the greenhouse, then pinch out the tips.


I under-plant my tomatoes with basil, as basil and tomato go together. It makes it easy to make a basil and tomato salad, but also has a preventative effect on aphids. Companion planting with French marigolds – tagetes – also works as the aphids will be repelled by their smell. Watering is crucial for consistently good fruits. Before the flowers have formed, water once a week or so and feed once a fortnight. Once the flowers and fruit have formed, water twice a week and feed once a week. What tomatoes don’t like is inconsistent watering, this tends to lead to splits and problems with bottom rot. Like children, they appreciate a routine and will repay you when they are looked after in a consistent way.

Once ready ripe, keep picking, this will help to extend the harvest as long as possible. It also means you can use them in a range of delicious recipes. Check out some tomato recipes here.

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3 thoughts on “How to train tomatoes

  1. So I have been following your blog for a few weeks now. I must say it is quite nice to find another who enjoys gardening and cooking. I do not know the extent of your knowledge in either the kitchen or the allotment. Those side shoots you were talking about are called “suckers.” If adventurous, one could transplant them and form an entire new plant. Thanks for the post and those awesome pictures!

    • Thanks for your comment. I’m kind of learning about the gardening, so any advice gratefully accepted. I’ll give it a go taking off the suckers and planting a few. Always good to have tomato plants growing. More the merrier. Thanks again for your kind words.

  2. Pingback: HOW TO TRAIN TOMATOES

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